Final Boss Form

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Why is it that people are willing to spend $20 on a bowl of pasta with sauce that they might actually be able to replicate pretty faithfully at home, yet they balk at the notion of a white-table cloth Thai restaurant, or a tacos that cost more than $3 each? Even in a city as “cosmopolitan” as New York, restaurant openings like Tamarind Tribeca (Indian) and Lotus of Siam (Thai) always seem to elicit this knee-jerk reaction from some diners who have decided that certain countries produce food that belongs in the “cheap eats” category—and it’s not allowed out. (Side note: How often do magazine lists of “cheap eats” double as rundowns of outer-borough ethnic foods?)

Yelp, Chowhound, and other restaurant sites are littered with comments like, “$5 for dumplings?? I’ll go to Flushing, thanks!” or “When I was backpacking in India this dish cost like five cents, only an idiot would pay that much!” Yet you never see complaints about the prices at Western restaurants framed in these terms, because it’s ingrained in people’s heads that these foods are somehow “worth” more. If we’re talking foie gras or chateaubriand, fair enough. But be real: You know damn well that rigatoni sorrentino is no more expensive to produce than a plate of duck laab, so to decry a pricey version as a ripoff is disingenuous. This question of perceived value is becoming increasingly troublesome as more non-native (read: white) chefs take on “ethnic” cuisines, and suddenly it’s okay to charge $14 for shu mai because hey, the chef is ELEVATING the cuisine.

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newyorker:

Amy Merrick examines a controversial approach to minimizing labor costs—and how some businesses are changing the formula.

The managers, at least, have reliable schedules and predictable incomes. For low-wage workers, flexibility favors only their employers, who maintain a large pool of part-timers in order to make it easier to shuffle schedules. When employees request flexibility for themselves—to work around college classes or child-care availability—they tend to be penalized. In a survey of managers at a women’s clothing chain, Susan Lambert, a University of Chicago researcher who has collaborated with Haley-Lock, found that more than eighty per cent gave more hours to employees who placed fewer restrictions on their availability.

Photograph by Ted S. Warren/AP

(Source: newyorker.com)

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U.S. auto sales are approaching the highest levels that the market can sustainably support and could suffer long-term damage as automakers increasingly turn to subprime financing and seven-year loans to boost market share, the top sales executive at American Honda warned today.

John Mendel, executive vice president of sales for American Honda, said the decline in the company’s U.S. market share, from 9.7 percent a year ago to 9.1 percent for the first seven months of 2014, won’t prompt it to do “stupid things in the short-term that damage the person who bought yesterday.”

He said extended loan terms and other strategies being employed by competitors hurt resale values, customer loyalty and ultimately profits.

“It’s a very, very short-term tactic,” Mendel said, “especially in the subprime area, because you not only are pulling sales forward, you’re probably pulling people out of used cars into a new car that maybe they can’t afford.”

Mendel said the U.S. market began shifting last year and is now “near the top,” with sales on pace to reach at least 16.2 million units this year. He said annual sales of 16.5 million is “probably a good assumption” for automakers to use in their near-term planning.

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Honda’s Mendel says U.S. sales ‘near top,’ warns market may suffer from ‘stupid things’ First: I never realized subprime car loans were a thing. Second: I’ve always wondered when the American market could or would reach “Peak Car”.
hifructosemag:

We visited Philadelphia-based artist Nosego in his studio as he finishes up a new series of paintings for his upcoming show at Thinkspace, “Open Channels.” Nosego says that the fantastical creatures in his paintings represent the idea of inner strength. See more on Hi-Fructose. 
ZoomInfo
hifructosemag:

We visited Philadelphia-based artist Nosego in his studio as he finishes up a new series of paintings for his upcoming show at Thinkspace, “Open Channels.” Nosego says that the fantastical creatures in his paintings represent the idea of inner strength. See more on Hi-Fructose. 
ZoomInfo
hifructosemag:

We visited Philadelphia-based artist Nosego in his studio as he finishes up a new series of paintings for his upcoming show at Thinkspace, “Open Channels.” Nosego says that the fantastical creatures in his paintings represent the idea of inner strength. See more on Hi-Fructose. 
ZoomInfo

hifructosemag:

We visited Philadelphia-based artist Nosego in his studio as he finishes up a new series of paintings for his upcoming show at Thinkspace, “Open Channels.” Nosego says that the fantastical creatures in his paintings represent the idea of inner strength. See more on Hi-Fructose. 

(via cannonballhands)

futurescope:

Until: Who wants to live for ever? Exploring when is the right age to die

Do you want to live to 100? 1,000? What about for ever? Meet a man seeking immortality, leading age-research scientists, the very young and the very old as they grapple with deciding what is the right age to die in Until, a journey of the lifetime.

The human lifespan is increasing by five hours a day – every day. But how much life is enough? What if society reached a point where individuals could essentially choose how long they lived? At what age would people decide to call it a day, meet their maker and embrace death? And, for those reaching towards immortality, what would they do with their infinite time?

These are the profound questions explored in Until. Part science, part philosophy, this film invites us all to ask just one question: would I want to live for ever?


Winner of the Imagine Science Film Festival’s ‘Nature People’s Choice award’, 2011.

Directed, filmed and edited by Barry J Gibb.

[via mosaic]

(via filmoid)