Final Boss Form

stevewyshywaniuk:

socialjusticekoolaid:

I don’t care what someone else tries to tell you, your retweeting and reblogging matters. You’ve made a difference in Ferguson, in New York, in LA, and around the world by keeping these stories boosted and present. Don’t stop, ever. #staywoke #farfromover

146k is pretty amazing.

the-unstoppable-juggernaut:

poussssey:

the-legion-of-fandoms:

Why are we not talking about Derrick Coleman????
He’s been legally Deaf since he was 3 years old
That’s 20 years
He received a letter from a fan who’s also Deaf and he wrote back an inspirational reply
He’s the first ever Deaf offensive player in the league.
He’s also the first to score a touchdown
In order to play football, he has to watch everyone else and move when they move, wear hearing aids, and he has to read Quarterback Russell Wilson’s lips in order to know what the play is, and he still manages to do it and do it well.
He’s just an inspiration to me and a lot of others.

Who’s not talkin bout him? I love this guy

fuckin sick. high levels of sight, reflexes and reaction speed. superhero type shit right here
ZoomInfo
the-unstoppable-juggernaut:

poussssey:

the-legion-of-fandoms:

Why are we not talking about Derrick Coleman????
He’s been legally Deaf since he was 3 years old
That’s 20 years
He received a letter from a fan who’s also Deaf and he wrote back an inspirational reply
He’s the first ever Deaf offensive player in the league.
He’s also the first to score a touchdown
In order to play football, he has to watch everyone else and move when they move, wear hearing aids, and he has to read Quarterback Russell Wilson’s lips in order to know what the play is, and he still manages to do it and do it well.
He’s just an inspiration to me and a lot of others.

Who’s not talkin bout him? I love this guy

fuckin sick. high levels of sight, reflexes and reaction speed. superhero type shit right here
ZoomInfo
the-unstoppable-juggernaut:

poussssey:

the-legion-of-fandoms:

Why are we not talking about Derrick Coleman????
He’s been legally Deaf since he was 3 years old
That’s 20 years
He received a letter from a fan who’s also Deaf and he wrote back an inspirational reply
He’s the first ever Deaf offensive player in the league.
He’s also the first to score a touchdown
In order to play football, he has to watch everyone else and move when they move, wear hearing aids, and he has to read Quarterback Russell Wilson’s lips in order to know what the play is, and he still manages to do it and do it well.
He’s just an inspiration to me and a lot of others.

Who’s not talkin bout him? I love this guy

fuckin sick. high levels of sight, reflexes and reaction speed. superhero type shit right here
ZoomInfo
the-unstoppable-juggernaut:

poussssey:

the-legion-of-fandoms:

Why are we not talking about Derrick Coleman????
He’s been legally Deaf since he was 3 years old
That’s 20 years
He received a letter from a fan who’s also Deaf and he wrote back an inspirational reply
He’s the first ever Deaf offensive player in the league.
He’s also the first to score a touchdown
In order to play football, he has to watch everyone else and move when they move, wear hearing aids, and he has to read Quarterback Russell Wilson’s lips in order to know what the play is, and he still manages to do it and do it well.
He’s just an inspiration to me and a lot of others.

Who’s not talkin bout him? I love this guy

fuckin sick. high levels of sight, reflexes and reaction speed. superhero type shit right here
ZoomInfo
the-unstoppable-juggernaut:

poussssey:

the-legion-of-fandoms:

Why are we not talking about Derrick Coleman????
He’s been legally Deaf since he was 3 years old
That’s 20 years
He received a letter from a fan who’s also Deaf and he wrote back an inspirational reply
He’s the first ever Deaf offensive player in the league.
He’s also the first to score a touchdown
In order to play football, he has to watch everyone else and move when they move, wear hearing aids, and he has to read Quarterback Russell Wilson’s lips in order to know what the play is, and he still manages to do it and do it well.
He’s just an inspiration to me and a lot of others.

Who’s not talkin bout him? I love this guy

fuckin sick. high levels of sight, reflexes and reaction speed. superhero type shit right here
ZoomInfo
the-unstoppable-juggernaut:

poussssey:

the-legion-of-fandoms:

Why are we not talking about Derrick Coleman????
He’s been legally Deaf since he was 3 years old
That’s 20 years
He received a letter from a fan who’s also Deaf and he wrote back an inspirational reply
He’s the first ever Deaf offensive player in the league.
He’s also the first to score a touchdown
In order to play football, he has to watch everyone else and move when they move, wear hearing aids, and he has to read Quarterback Russell Wilson’s lips in order to know what the play is, and he still manages to do it and do it well.
He’s just an inspiration to me and a lot of others.

Who’s not talkin bout him? I love this guy

fuckin sick. high levels of sight, reflexes and reaction speed. superhero type shit right here
ZoomInfo
the-unstoppable-juggernaut:

poussssey:

the-legion-of-fandoms:

Why are we not talking about Derrick Coleman????
He’s been legally Deaf since he was 3 years old
That’s 20 years
He received a letter from a fan who’s also Deaf and he wrote back an inspirational reply
He’s the first ever Deaf offensive player in the league.
He’s also the first to score a touchdown
In order to play football, he has to watch everyone else and move when they move, wear hearing aids, and he has to read Quarterback Russell Wilson’s lips in order to know what the play is, and he still manages to do it and do it well.
He’s just an inspiration to me and a lot of others.

Who’s not talkin bout him? I love this guy

fuckin sick. high levels of sight, reflexes and reaction speed. superhero type shit right here
ZoomInfo

the-unstoppable-juggernaut:

poussssey:

the-legion-of-fandoms:

Why are we not talking about Derrick Coleman????

  • He’s been legally Deaf since he was 3 years old
  • That’s 20 years
  • He received a letter from a fan who’s also Deaf and he wrote back an inspirational reply
  • He’s the first ever Deaf offensive player in the league.
  • He’s also the first to score a touchdown
  • In order to play football, he has to watch everyone else and move when they move, wear hearing aids, and he has to read Quarterback Russell Wilson’s lips in order to know what the play is, and he still manages to do it and do it well.
  • He’s just an inspiration to me and a lot of others.

Who’s not talkin bout him? I love this guy

fuckin sick. high levels of sight, reflexes and reaction speed. superhero type shit right here

(via iwakeupblack)

micdotcom:

The NFL has apologized for penalizing Muslim player for praying 

Another week done, another PR disaster for the NFL.

This one came in the middle of Monday Night Football, after Kansas City Chiefs safety Husain Abdullah returned an interception for a touchdown. Abdullah is a practicing Muslim — he even skipped an entire football season to make a pilgrimage to Mecca — and prostrated himself in the end zone in prayer. The result? A 15-yard penalty for excessive celebration.

The apologized for this one quickly

(via laughterkey)

"Soderbergh told me recently that a lot of the show’s simplicity is driven by time and budget constraints. They’re working on a tight schedule and have to shoot a lot of script pages every day, so they don’t have the luxury of shooting things five different ways and deciding later which one they like the best. The use of compact, high-definition, light-sensitive digital cameras allows Soderbergh to shoot with one or two visible light sources, often of fairly low wattage, and achieve naturalistic lighting effects that Stanley Kubrick spent a fortune on when shooting the visually similar Barry Lyndon (the first movie with interiors shot entirely by candlelight) on 35mm film 40 years ago. I’m almost reluctant to convey all that information here, though, because it might make it sound as if what Soderbergh is doing is easy. It’s really not. That fusebox scene I mentioned earlier is so complex, in terms of choreography, that a lot of period shows and films would set aside a day to block it, rehearse it, and shoot it. Soderbergh did it in two hours, from start to finish. You can’t work that fast and get such great results unless you’re absorbed in your craft so fully that it has become instinctive, in the way that a painter’s brushstrokes are instinctive, or a great basketball player’s moves are instinctive. At some point, intelligence becomes physical. The eyes and hands are just taking dictation from the subconscious. That, I suspect, is the level at which Soderbergh is operating now, 25 years after the premiere of his first feature, sex, lies, and videotape."
"

Then we discovered an article in Wired magazine about NASA scientists using genetic algorithms to design extremely sensitive aerials for satellites [4]. We contacted the scientists, and to our surprise and delight they agreed to design an aerial specialised for picking up signals at 131.725 Mhz (the transmission frequency for ACARS).

The aerial they designed for us was unexpectedly large and complicated, and we worried it might be too fragile to stand up. We sent the design to Arup, the engineering firm, for structural analysis. They reported that the aerial would have to be supported at three specific points, and it would then settle into the correct shape under its own weight.

"
"The internet has been a massive boon to narrative radio, with the BBC iPlayer and downloads making mainstream content more accessible than ever before, and podcasting getting in on the radio drama act with independent online shows like Welcome to Night Vale and Thrilling Adventure Hour. Having their entire back-catalogue available online means that these shows pick up more and more fans over time. As magical as the iPlayer is, that’s one of the main issues with BBC drama content: it almost always disappears after 7 days. The plan is to extend that to 30 days in the near future, but even then there will still be a great disappointment when realising that, after listening to eight episodes of a serial, there’s nowhere one can find the rest of the episodes until they’re repeated at 3 AM on Radio 4Extra in 2019."

npr:

With so much talk these days of bad screen time, what is good screen time? It’s a question that perplexes parents and educators alike.

Kids And Screen Time: Cutting Through The Static

GIF credit: LA Johnson for NPR

Wait what?

The idea behind Fitz-Roy’s digital citizenship class is to get kids thinking hard about the dangers of social media before they have Twitter handles or Facebook pages.Thirteen-year-old Tom Zimmerman gets it: “One example: this one kid who was, like, in this room, and he had, like, this fake lightsaber, and he was acting really crazy. And it looked really stupid. And it was funny, but I’m sure that kid won’t want it in the future. But so many people have taken that video and put it on their channels that there’s no way of getting rid of it.” 

No, Thirteen-year-old Tom doesn’t get it at all.

Actually, Ghyslain (Star Wars Kid) went through a really tough time but grew up just fine so don’t be afraid to express yourself. But make sure you’re doing it in a space (and media) that you feel safe. And make sure you’re expressing yourself with the right motivation, like, say, how awesome it would be to be to have the skills of Darth Maul as opposed to say, making a video of yourself sexually assaulting people on the street because you’re a sociopathic prick.

"There’s a temptation within many newspapers to believe that the only problem the web has created is how to get all that excellent journalism to readers most efficiently, and to see the social web as merely a distribution mechanism or PR gesture. Engaging with readers is much more than that — it’s the key to developing a new kind of interactive, two-way journalism, and that journalism may ultimately be the only kind that survives."
stormingtheivory:

allacharade:

salon:

Academia is a true nightmare. 

Sorry for the click-bate-y title, but this is kind of really important. While tuition is going up, the people actually doing the teaching are being severally underpaid. What follows are some particularly upsetting excepts:

Over three quarters of college professors are adjunct. Legally, adjunct positions are part-time, at-will employment. Universities pay adjunct professors by the course, anywhere between $1,000 to $5,000. So if a professor teaches three courses in both the fall and spring semesters at a rate of $3000 per course, they’ll make $18,000 dollars. The average full-time barista makes the same yearly wage. However, a full-time adjunct works more than 40 hours a week. They’re not paid for most of those hours.
…
Some professors in his situation became homeless. Oliver was “fortunate” enough to only require food stamps, a fact of life for many adjuncts.
“It’s completely insane,” he said. “And this isn’t happening just to me. More and more people are doing it.”
“We have food stamps,” said the anonymous adjunct from Indiana. “We wouldn’t be able to survive without them.”
“Many professors are on food stamps and they go to food donation centers. They donate plasma. And that’s a pretty regular occurrence,” Merklein told Salon.
…
“As soon as they hear about you organizing, they go on the defensive,” Merklein said. “For instance, at my community college, I am being intimidated constantly and threatened in various ways, hypothetically usually. They don’t like to say something that’s an outright direct threat. … They get really freaked out when they see pamphlets around the adjunct faculty office and everyone’s wearing buttons regardless of what professional organization or union it is. They will then go on the offensive. They will usually contact their attorney who is there to protect the school as a business and to act in an anti-labor capacity.”
The most telling phrase in Merklein’s words are “the school as a business.” Colleges across the country have transitioned from bastions of intellectual enlightenment to resort hotels prizing amenities above academics. Case in point: The ludicrously extravagant gyms in America’s larger universities are home to rock climbing walls, corkscrew tracks, rooftop gardens, and a lazy river. Schools have billions to invest in housing and other on-campus projects. Schools have millions (or in some cases “mere” hundreds of thousands) to pay administrators.  Yet schools can’t find the money to hire more full-time professors. If one follows the money, it’s clear that colleges view education as tertiary. The rigor of a university’s courses doesn’t attract the awe of doe-eyed high school seniors. Lavish dorms and other luxuries do.

Anyone going to college now, consider organizing for your faculty. They are at risk of being fired for it, you are not. The university might be more willing to listen to students demanding the education they are paying for. Make noise for the people making your degree possible.
If you are touring colleges, ask what percentage of the faculty are adjucts. Ask what they are paid.
If you are not in a position to do these things, there are two petitions in the linked article to sign.
and honestly if you can read about shit like this and still be against unions I don’t know what to tell you.

Can’t wait to get my degree so I can start teaching!
ZoomInfo
stormingtheivory:

allacharade:

salon:

Academia is a true nightmare. 

Sorry for the click-bate-y title, but this is kind of really important. While tuition is going up, the people actually doing the teaching are being severally underpaid. What follows are some particularly upsetting excepts:

Over three quarters of college professors are adjunct. Legally, adjunct positions are part-time, at-will employment. Universities pay adjunct professors by the course, anywhere between $1,000 to $5,000. So if a professor teaches three courses in both the fall and spring semesters at a rate of $3000 per course, they’ll make $18,000 dollars. The average full-time barista makes the same yearly wage. However, a full-time adjunct works more than 40 hours a week. They’re not paid for most of those hours.
…
Some professors in his situation became homeless. Oliver was “fortunate” enough to only require food stamps, a fact of life for many adjuncts.
“It’s completely insane,” he said. “And this isn’t happening just to me. More and more people are doing it.”
“We have food stamps,” said the anonymous adjunct from Indiana. “We wouldn’t be able to survive without them.”
“Many professors are on food stamps and they go to food donation centers. They donate plasma. And that’s a pretty regular occurrence,” Merklein told Salon.
…
“As soon as they hear about you organizing, they go on the defensive,” Merklein said. “For instance, at my community college, I am being intimidated constantly and threatened in various ways, hypothetically usually. They don’t like to say something that’s an outright direct threat. … They get really freaked out when they see pamphlets around the adjunct faculty office and everyone’s wearing buttons regardless of what professional organization or union it is. They will then go on the offensive. They will usually contact their attorney who is there to protect the school as a business and to act in an anti-labor capacity.”
The most telling phrase in Merklein’s words are “the school as a business.” Colleges across the country have transitioned from bastions of intellectual enlightenment to resort hotels prizing amenities above academics. Case in point: The ludicrously extravagant gyms in America’s larger universities are home to rock climbing walls, corkscrew tracks, rooftop gardens, and a lazy river. Schools have billions to invest in housing and other on-campus projects. Schools have millions (or in some cases “mere” hundreds of thousands) to pay administrators.  Yet schools can’t find the money to hire more full-time professors. If one follows the money, it’s clear that colleges view education as tertiary. The rigor of a university’s courses doesn’t attract the awe of doe-eyed high school seniors. Lavish dorms and other luxuries do.

Anyone going to college now, consider organizing for your faculty. They are at risk of being fired for it, you are not. The university might be more willing to listen to students demanding the education they are paying for. Make noise for the people making your degree possible.
If you are touring colleges, ask what percentage of the faculty are adjucts. Ask what they are paid.
If you are not in a position to do these things, there are two petitions in the linked article to sign.
and honestly if you can read about shit like this and still be against unions I don’t know what to tell you.

Can’t wait to get my degree so I can start teaching!
ZoomInfo

stormingtheivory:

allacharade:

salon:

Academia is a true nightmare. 

Sorry for the click-bate-y title, but this is kind of really important. While tuition is going up, the people actually doing the teaching are being severally underpaid. What follows are some particularly upsetting excepts:

Over three quarters of college professors are adjunct. Legally, adjunct positions are part-time, at-will employment. Universities pay adjunct professors by the course, anywhere between $1,000 to $5,000. So if a professor teaches three courses in both the fall and spring semesters at a rate of $3000 per course, they’ll make $18,000 dollars. The average full-time barista makes the same yearly wage. However, a full-time adjunct works more than 40 hours a week. They’re not paid for most of those hours.

Some professors in his situation became homeless. Oliver was “fortunate” enough to only require food stamps, a fact of life for many adjuncts.

“It’s completely insane,” he said. “And this isn’t happening just to me. More and more people are doing it.”

“We have food stamps,” said the anonymous adjunct from Indiana. “We wouldn’t be able to survive without them.”

“Many professors are on food stamps and they go to food donation centers. They donate plasma. And that’s a pretty regular occurrence,” Merklein told Salon.

“As soon as they hear about you organizing, they go on the defensive,” Merklein said. “For instance, at my community college, I am being intimidated constantly and threatened in various ways, hypothetically usually. They don’t like to say something that’s an outright direct threat. … They get really freaked out when they see pamphlets around the adjunct faculty office and everyone’s wearing buttons regardless of what professional organization or union it is. They will then go on the offensive. They will usually contact their attorney who is there to protect the school as a business and to act in an anti-labor capacity.”

The most telling phrase in Merklein’s words are “the school as a business.” Colleges across the country have transitioned from bastions of intellectual enlightenment to resort hotels prizing amenities above academics. Case in point: The ludicrously extravagant gyms in America’s larger universities are home to rock climbing walls, corkscrew tracks, rooftop gardens, and a lazy river. Schools have billions to invest in housing and other on-campus projects. Schools have millions (or in some cases “mere” hundreds of thousands) to pay administrators.  Yet schools can’t find the money to hire more full-time professors. If one follows the money, it’s clear that colleges view education as tertiary. The rigor of a university’s courses doesn’t attract the awe of doe-eyed high school seniors. Lavish dorms and other luxuries do.

Anyone going to college now, consider organizing for your faculty. They are at risk of being fired for it, you are not. The university might be more willing to listen to students demanding the education they are paying for. Make noise for the people making your degree possible.

If you are touring colleges, ask what percentage of the faculty are adjucts. Ask what they are paid.

If you are not in a position to do these things, there are two petitions in the linked article to sign.

and honestly if you can read about shit like this and still be against unions I don’t know what to tell you.

Can’t wait to get my degree so I can start teaching!