Final Boss Form

At the panel at Comic Con, George R.R Martin said "The show is the show and the books are the books," regarding fans who read the books that were upset of add or missing events/characters.
Anonymous

fandomisreality:

kenyatta:

agameofclothes:

yes… but I can still be upset.

I’ve been thinking about all of the reasons we get upset when “the movie/show/musical/album” isn’t like the book.

  • Authenticity/Truthfulness (“That isn’t the way it happened in the book”)
  • Incongruence of experience with other fans (“We’re not talking about the same thing.”)

Anything else?

I think it’s also that people picture certain scenes and are really enthusiastic about certain scenes, characters, relationships, etc—enthusiastic about the way they were first portrayed in the book. And naturally, they want to see them portrayed that way on screen.

Enthusiastic + emotional response. Good catch that my robot heart did not compute.

At the panel at Comic Con, George R.R Martin said "The show is the show and the books are the books," regarding fans who read the books that were upset of add or missing events/characters.
Anonymous

agameofclothes:

yes… but I can still be upset.

I’ve been thinking about all of the reasons we get upset when “the movie/show/musical/album” isn’t like the book.

  • Authenticity/Truthfulness (“That isn’t the way it happened in the book”)
  • Incongruence of experience with other fans (“We’re not talking about the same thing.”)

Anything else?

"And yet, the funny thing about viral images is how endlessly easy it is to misunderstand them. The selfie is already a politically and socially fraught form of expression, as many sociologists and social media theorists have written before; while self-portraits are understood by many to be little more than a flagrant show of narcissism or a plea for attention, they may mean something different to the taker herself. It’s less a matter of self-glorification than self-documentation — “I was here.” “This is who I was that day.” “This happened.”

“Self captured images allow young adults and teens to express their mood states and share important experiences,” the clinical psychologist Andrea Letamendi told Time last September. In other words — to paraphrase Jennifer Outllette, who recently published a book on “the science of self” — selfies aren’t merely a “look-at-me!” attention-grab. They’re an attempt to place oneself in a context, to understand how we fit into a bigger picture."
"Are you the SAT because I’d do you for 3 hours and 45 minutes with a 10 minute break halfway through for snacks, and then I can stare at you for like 10 minutes and think ‘wow, I hope I don’t ruin this.’"
Dude on OKC with the best pick up lines I have ever heard (via katamarang)

(via thatlameblog)