On the Internet, Everybody Knows You’re a Dog by Ted Rheingold

When comments on the megapopular TechCrunch blog were tied to real Facebook profiles, the experience went from a juvenile insult-fest to a civil value-add information exchange. Tumblr has motivated readers topublish their reactions to their own tumblr, making every reader an author and every author a reader.SoundCloud adds music to the experience. Twitter allows spontaneous ad hoc discussion groups on any topic at any time, simply by @’ing a Twitter author – which thanks to the public nature of the platform immediately makes the responder a public author as well. And on xojane.com, editor-in-chief Jane Pratt canannotate articles with a highlighter – and authors’ responses to reader comments are also highlighted and elevated so they’re an ongoing part of the conversation.

The bit about the evolution of comment systems for context specific platforms is good and all but to be honest, I’m really reblogging this b/c it has Ted in a dog suit covered by a venn diagram.

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    this is a really interesting piece, but i can’t believe it didn’t mention pseudonymity
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