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Posts tagged with 'interesting'.
Webbys “The Web at 25” project visualizes all the connections from a single web page
As part of the webbys “The Web at 25” (it’s the 25th birthday of the web) celebration leading up to this year’s Webby Awards, data scientist Santiago Ortiz built a real time web crawler visualization that shows you all of the connections made from a single web page:

Crawlers are exploration algorithms that start in tiny regions of a vast space and move blindly in all possible directions. They are a good metaphor for human pursuit of knowledge. Bots were critical in the early years of the Web, since they were the only way to know what was out there and the only method to index all (accessible) sites.

I made gifs of the first five sites I gave it: cern (first web page ever), geocities, links.net, tumblr, and nytimes. (I only captured the first 10-15 seconds of each run.)
[x]
ZoomInfo
Webbys “The Web at 25” project visualizes all the connections from a single web page
As part of the webbys “The Web at 25” (it’s the 25th birthday of the web) celebration leading up to this year’s Webby Awards, data scientist Santiago Ortiz built a real time web crawler visualization that shows you all of the connections made from a single web page:

Crawlers are exploration algorithms that start in tiny regions of a vast space and move blindly in all possible directions. They are a good metaphor for human pursuit of knowledge. Bots were critical in the early years of the Web, since they were the only way to know what was out there and the only method to index all (accessible) sites.

I made gifs of the first five sites I gave it: cern (first web page ever), geocities, links.net, tumblr, and nytimes. (I only captured the first 10-15 seconds of each run.)
[x]
ZoomInfo
Webbys “The Web at 25” project visualizes all the connections from a single web page
As part of the webbys “The Web at 25” (it’s the 25th birthday of the web) celebration leading up to this year’s Webby Awards, data scientist Santiago Ortiz built a real time web crawler visualization that shows you all of the connections made from a single web page:

Crawlers are exploration algorithms that start in tiny regions of a vast space and move blindly in all possible directions. They are a good metaphor for human pursuit of knowledge. Bots were critical in the early years of the Web, since they were the only way to know what was out there and the only method to index all (accessible) sites.

I made gifs of the first five sites I gave it: cern (first web page ever), geocities, links.net, tumblr, and nytimes. (I only captured the first 10-15 seconds of each run.)
[x]
ZoomInfo
Webbys “The Web at 25” project visualizes all the connections from a single web page
As part of the webbys “The Web at 25” (it’s the 25th birthday of the web) celebration leading up to this year’s Webby Awards, data scientist Santiago Ortiz built a real time web crawler visualization that shows you all of the connections made from a single web page:

Crawlers are exploration algorithms that start in tiny regions of a vast space and move blindly in all possible directions. They are a good metaphor for human pursuit of knowledge. Bots were critical in the early years of the Web, since they were the only way to know what was out there and the only method to index all (accessible) sites.

I made gifs of the first five sites I gave it: cern (first web page ever), geocities, links.net, tumblr, and nytimes. (I only captured the first 10-15 seconds of each run.)
[x]
ZoomInfo
Webbys “The Web at 25” project visualizes all the connections from a single web page
As part of the webbys “The Web at 25” (it’s the 25th birthday of the web) celebration leading up to this year’s Webby Awards, data scientist Santiago Ortiz built a real time web crawler visualization that shows you all of the connections made from a single web page:

Crawlers are exploration algorithms that start in tiny regions of a vast space and move blindly in all possible directions. They are a good metaphor for human pursuit of knowledge. Bots were critical in the early years of the Web, since they were the only way to know what was out there and the only method to index all (accessible) sites.

I made gifs of the first five sites I gave it: cern (first web page ever), geocities, links.net, tumblr, and nytimes. (I only captured the first 10-15 seconds of each run.)
[x]
ZoomInfo

Webbys “The Web at 25” project visualizes all the connections from a single web page

As part of the webbys “The Web at 25” (it’s the 25th birthday of the web) celebration leading up to this year’s Webby Awards, data scientist Santiago Ortiz built a real time web crawler visualization that shows you all of the connections made from a single web page:

Crawlers are exploration algorithms that start in tiny regions of a vast space and move blindly in all possible directions. They are a good metaphor for human pursuit of knowledge. Bots were critical in the early years of the Web, since they were the only way to know what was out there and the only method to index all (accessible) sites.

I made gifs of the first five sites I gave it: cern (first web page ever), geocities, links.net, tumblr, and nytimes. (I only captured the first 10-15 seconds of each run.)

[x]

Mercury, Nevada - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mercury, Nevada, is a closed city in Nye CountyNevada, United States, 5 miles (8.0 km) north of U.S. Route 95 at a point 65 miles (105 km) northwest of Las Vegas. It is situated within the Nevada Test Site and was constructed by the Atomic Energy Commission to house and service the staff of the test site. The specific site was known as Jackass Flats, NV[2] and nearby Nevada Test Site 400.[3] Today, the site is governed by the United States Department of Energy. As part of the test site, the town is not accessible to the general public. It was named after the mercury mines which flourished in its general vicinity a century before the town itself was established. The current population is unknown.

Hiroo Onoda - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Hiroo Onoda (小野田 寛郎 Onoda Hirō, March 19, 1922 – January 16, 2014) was an Imperial Japanese Army intelligence officer who fought in World War II and did not surrender until 1974.

Onoda trained as an intelligence officer in the commando class “Futamata” (二俣分校 futamata-bunkō) of Nakano School. On December 26, 1944, he was sent to Lubang Island in the Philippines. He was ordered to do all he could to hamper enemy attacks on the island, including destroying the airstrip and the pier at the harbor. Onoda’s orders also stated that under no circumstances was he to surrender or take his own life.

Onoda continued his campaign as a Japanese holdout, initially living in the mountains with three fellow soldiers. The first time they saw a leaflet announcing that Japan had surrendered was in October 1945; another cell had killed a cow and found a leaflet left behind by islanders which read: “The war ended on August 15. Come down from the mountains!” Onoda’s group looked very closely at the leaflet to determine whether it was genuine, and decided it was not.

After extensive searches by others, Norio Suzuki (鈴木 紀夫 Suzuki Norio), a Japanese explorer and adventurer, independently encountered a Japanese soldier after four days of searching. 

Suzuki expressed his decision for looking for the officer in this way: He wanted to search for “Lieutenant Onoda, a panda, and the Abominable Snowman, in that order”. 

When Onoda was first discovered, he was ready to shoot Norio Suzuki at first sight, but fortunately, Suzuki had read all about the fugitive and quickly said: “Onoda-san, the emperor and the people of Japan are worried about you.” Onoda described this moment in a 2010 interview: "This hippie boy Suzuki came to the island to listen to the feelings of a Japanese soldier. Suzuki asked me why I would not come out…"

Onoda and Suzuki became friends, but Onoda still refused to surrender, saying that he was waiting for orders from a superior officer. Suzuki returned to Japan with photographs of himself and Onoda as proof of their encounter, and the Japanese government located Onoda’s commanding officer, Major Yoshimi Taniguchi, who had since become a bookseller. He flew to Lubang where on March 9, 1974, he properly relieved Onoda of duty and he surrendered.

Urban heat island - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

An urban heat island (UHI) is a metropolitan area that is significantly warmer than its surrounding rural areas due to human activities. The phenomenon was first investigated and described by Luke Howard in the 1810s, although he was not the one to name the phenomenon. The temperature difference usually is larger at night than during the day, and is most apparent when winds are weak. UHI is most noticeable during the summer and winter. The main cause of the urban heat island effect is from the modification of land surfaces, which use materials that effectively store short-wave radiation. Waste heat generated by energy usage is a secondary contributor. As a population center grows, it tends to expand its area and increase its average temperature. The less-used term heat island refers to any area, populated or not, which is consistently hotter than the surrounding area.

Monthly rainfall is greater downwind of cities, partially due to the UHI. Increases in heat within urban centers increases the length of growing seasons, and decreases the occurrence of weak tornadoes. The UHI decreases air quality by increasing the production of pollutants such as ozone, and decreases water quality as warmer waters flow into area streams and put stress on their ecosystems.

Not all cities have a distinct urban heat island. Mitigation of the urban heat island effect can be accomplished through the use of green roofs and the use of lighter-colored surfaces in urban areas, which reflect more sunlight and absorb less heat.

Despite concerns raised about its possible contribution to global warming, comparisons between urban and rural areas show that the urban heat island effects have little influence on global mean temperature trends.

What the hill in the iconic Windows XP background photo looks like today.

It was a regular Friday afternoon in 1996 when photographer Charles O’Rear took the drive through California’s wine country to see his then-girlfriend Daphne. Bliss, meanwhile, has gone on to become one of the world’s most iconic photographs, chosen as the default wallpaper of Microsoft’s operating system.
Despite what many people might think, the original frame of Bliss was completely unaltered and unedited by Chuck when he submitted it to Corbis, the stock photo and image licensing service founded by Bill Gates in 1989.
"I think it’s going to be around forever," he says. "When you are 90 years old, somewhere a photograph like Bliss will appear and you will say ‘I remember that. When we had computers on our desk, that was on the screen’. Anywhere on this planet right now, if you stop somebody on the street and you show somebody that photograph, they’re going to say ‘I’ve seen that somewhere, I recognise that’.”
Today, Bliss looks very different to how it did in the late 1990s.
cnet.au: Behind the iconic Windows XP photo
ZoomInfo
What the hill in the iconic Windows XP background photo looks like today.

It was a regular Friday afternoon in 1996 when photographer Charles O’Rear took the drive through California’s wine country to see his then-girlfriend Daphne. Bliss, meanwhile, has gone on to become one of the world’s most iconic photographs, chosen as the default wallpaper of Microsoft’s operating system.
Despite what many people might think, the original frame of Bliss was completely unaltered and unedited by Chuck when he submitted it to Corbis, the stock photo and image licensing service founded by Bill Gates in 1989.
"I think it’s going to be around forever," he says. "When you are 90 years old, somewhere a photograph like Bliss will appear and you will say ‘I remember that. When we had computers on our desk, that was on the screen’. Anywhere on this planet right now, if you stop somebody on the street and you show somebody that photograph, they’re going to say ‘I’ve seen that somewhere, I recognise that’.”
Today, Bliss looks very different to how it did in the late 1990s.
cnet.au: Behind the iconic Windows XP photo
ZoomInfo

What the hill in the iconic Windows XP background photo looks like today.

It was a regular Friday afternoon in 1996 when photographer Charles O’Rear took the drive through California’s wine country to see his then-girlfriend Daphne. Bliss, meanwhile, has gone on to become one of the world’s most iconic photographs, chosen as the default wallpaper of Microsoft’s operating system.

Despite what many people might think, the original frame of Bliss was completely unaltered and unedited by Chuck when he submitted it to Corbis, the stock photo and image licensing service founded by Bill Gates in 1989.

"I think it’s going to be around forever," he says. "When you are 90 years old, somewhere a photograph like Bliss will appear and you will say ‘I remember that. When we had computers on our desk, that was on the screen’. Anywhere on this planet right now, if you stop somebody on the street and you show somebody that photograph, they’re going to say ‘I’ve seen that somewhere, I recognise that’.”

Today, Bliss looks very different to how it did in the late 1990s.

cnet.au: Behind the iconic Windows XP photo

"

This the first study to show specifically how memory is faulty, and how it can insert things from the present into memories of the past when those memories are retrieved. The study shows the exact point in time when that incorrectly recalled information gets implanted into an existing memory.

To help us survive, Bridge said, our memories adapt to an ever-changing environment and help us deal with what’s important now.

For the experiment, 17 men and women studied 168 object locations on a computer screen with varied backgrounds such as an underwater ocean scene or an aerial view of Midwest farmland. Next, researchers asked participants to try to place the object in the original location but on a new background screen. Participants would always place the objects in an incorrect location.

Participants took the test in an MRI scanner so scientists could observe their brain activity. Scientists also tracked participants’ eye movements, which sometimes were more revealing about the content of their memories — and if there was conflict in their choices — than the actual location they ended up choosing.

“Everyone likes to think of memory as this thing that lets us vividly remember our childhoods or what we did last week,” Voss said. “But memory is designed to help us make good decisions in the moment and, therefore, memory has to stay up-to-date. The information that is relevant right now can overwrite what was there to begin with.”

"

slavin:

Lip gloss to detect a spiked drink.

Site says that 1 out of 4 women have had their drinks spiked. I didn’t know that and don’t believe it cause the a website says so (nor do I disbelieve it cause Wikipedia says different), but I do know that this is proper and necessary science fiction happening right now.

(to be clear: getting your drink spiked is one of the worst things that can happen to you, short of what comes after that. Happened to a friend years ago in NYC.) 

      How to Create a Better Malware Warning Through Psychology

As part of their experiment, the researchers presented more than 500 men and women with variations of a Google Chrome warning incorporated one of the following angles:

  • Influence of authority
  • Social influence
  • Concrete threats
  • Vague threats

“What works best is to make the warning concrete; people ignore general warnings such as that a web page ‘might harm your computer,’ but do pay attention to a specific one such as that the page would ‘try to infect your computer with malware designed to steal your bank account and credit card details in order to defraud you.’”

“Warning text should include a clear and non-technical description of potential negative outcome or an informed direct warning given from a position of authority,” the researchers ultimately deduced.

Concrete threats – when individuals have a clear idea of what is happening and how much they are exposing themselves – wound up being the No. 1 predictor of click-through resistance.

The experiment found that authority – when the warnings come from trusted sources – was the No. 2 predictor. Trusted figures “elicit compliance” and in the study, can even extend to include Facebook friends.

      Microsoft disrupts botnet that generated $2.7M per month for operators | Ars Technica

On Thursday, Microsoft’s Digital Crimes Unit, the legal and technical team that has driven the takedown of botnets such as Bamital and Nitol during the past year, announced that it has moved with Europol, industry partners, and the FBI to disrupt yet another search fraud botnet. The ZeroAccess botnet, also known as ZAccess or Siref, has taken over approximately 2 million PCs worldwide; Microsoft estimates that it has cost search engine advertisers on Google, Bing, and Yahoo over $2.7 million each month.

According to security reporter Brian Krebs, ZeroAccess began its life cycle in 2009 as a delivery network for other malware—dropping paying customers’ viruses and Trojans, including “scareware” fake antivirus packages—onto PCs it had successfully infected. But since then, it has evolved into a “clickfraud” platform—intercepting search requests from the user’s Web browser and injecting fraudulent hyperlinks into the results returned from major search sites. The botnet operators get paid through advertising networks for the traffic sent to the sites as if the user had clicked on a legitimate ad.

      Stowe Boyd: Read the Responsive Organization Manifesto

stoweboyd:

Adam Pisoni, the CTO of Yammer, and a constellation of advocates have kicked off a new initiative promoting a new body of thinking about the way businesses operate. They have published a manifesto for what they are calling the Responsive Organization.

from the Manifesto

As the flow of information increases, companies are gaining competitive advantages by shifting their focus from efficiency to their ability to learn and respond rapidly to new information. Companies today are realizing that adaptability and iteration speed are paramount, necessitating a fundamental rethinking of corporate structures and information systems. Previous organizational strategies were designed for job functions that were mostly routine and static. Hierarchical systems of command and control allowed senior leadership to drive efficiency and predictability but at the expense of adaptability, free information flow, and rapid response. Leading companies are now restructuring for greater adaptability and iteration speed.

The Responsive Organization is built to learn and respond rapidly by optimizing for the open flow of information; encouraging experimentation and learning on rapid cycles; and organizing as a network of employees, customers, and partners motivated by shared purpose.

Read the manifesto, and sign up if you find the direction that the group is taking makes sense to you.

      IDN homograph attack - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The internationalized domain name (IDN) homograph attack is a way a malicious party may deceive computer users about what remote system they are communicating with, by exploiting the fact that many different characters look alike, (i.e., they are homographs, hence the term for the attack). For example, a person frequenting citibank.com may be lured to click the link [сitibank.com] (punycode: xn—itibank-xjg.com/) where the Latin C is replaced with the Cyrillic С.

The registration of homographic domain names is akin to typosquatting. The major difference is that in typosquatting the perpetrator relies on natural human typos, while in homograph spoofing the perpetrator intentionally deceives the web surfer with visually indistinguishable names. Indeed, it would be a rare accident for a web user to type, e.g., a Cyrillic letter within an otherwise English word such as “citibank”. There are cases in which a registration can be both typosquatting and homograph spoofing; the pairs of l/I, i/j, and 0/O are all both close together on keyboards and bear a certain amount of resemblance to each other.This kind of spoofing attack is also known as script spoofingUnicode incorporates numerous writing systems, and, for a number of reasons, similar-looking characters such as Greek Ο, Latin O, and Cyrillic О were not assigned the same code. Their incorrect or malicious usage is a possibility for security attacks.[1]

      The Pioneer Detectives

jkottke:

If you’re at all interested in the Pioneer Anomaly (and you really should be, it’sfascinating), The Pioneer Detectives ebook by Konstantin Kakaes looks interesting.

Explore one of the greatest scientific mysteries of our time, the Pioneer Anomaly: in the 1980s, NASA scientists detected an unknown force acting on the spacecraft Pioneer 10, the first man-made object to journey through the asteroid belt and study Jupiter, eventually leaving the solar system. No one seemed able to agree on a cause. (Dark matter? Tensor-vector-scalar gravity? Collisions with gravitons?) What did seem clear to those who became obsessed with it was that the Pioneer Anomaly had the potential to upend Einstein and Newton — to change everything we know about the universe.

Kakaes was a science writer for The Economist and studied physics at Harvard, so this topic seems right up his alley. Available for $2.99 for the Kindle and for iBooks on iOS.

"Finally, on a cultural note, the black color of the Hasselblads made for NASA was the primary reason why ‘black’ suddenly became a favored ‘professional look’, hence almost every commercially available camera was released in black during the subsequent decades. Only recently have the companies begun to be a more creative, producing cameras with metal exteriors of different kinds, and colorful plastics. This is probably one of the lesser known results of the early manned US-spaceflight program!"